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How to Break the Mold and Be an Independent Thinker

From Entrepreneur

Three tips to help you think independently and come up with creative solutions. ... Quick Read

America's Most Unusual Roadside Businesses

From Entrepreneur

Some small-business owners hawk their wares to America's motorists. But it's not just gas stations and fast food. ... Quick Read

Your Office in a Bag: What to Bring When You're Traveling for Work

From Entrepreneur

If you're on the road more than you're not, a few extra tools can make your work life easier and more productive without weighing you down. ... Quick Read

Executive pay: Because he?s worth it

From Economist

THIS has been a bumper year for John Hammergren. The boss of McKesson, a big American wholesaler of drugs and other health-care supplies, pocketed total compensation of $52m in the year to March, a nice rise on the $46m he received in 2011. But like Liberace he will be crying all the way to the bank, given the hostile reaction from shareholder activists. They are urging not just a ?no? in the ?say on pay? vote at the firm?s annual meeting later this month but a vote against his re-election to ... Quick Read

Steel: An inferno of unprofitability

From Economist

THE importance of steel is in no doubt. It is the material from which much of the modern world is made, from skyscrapers to washing machines. Governments everywhere regard a strong steelmaking business as a sign of economic virility, and thus hover anxiously over their domestic producers. A French minister recently threatened to nationalise ArcelorMittal?s Florange plant if it pursued plans to cut jobs and close two blast furnaces. Despite a weak world economy, global production of steel ... Quick Read

Schumpeter: Back to the drawing-board

From Economist

THE office looks like a cross between a Starbucks and a youth club. Bicycles are piled high in racks; there is a ping-pong table in a corner. Young people sit at long pine benches, sipping coffee and poring over laptops, the males looking as if they are taking part in a beard-growing competition. But do not be deceived by the laid-back atmosphere: this is the London branch of one of the world?s most successful design consultancies, IDEO. When it started up in Silicon Valley in 1991 one of ... Quick Read

French restaurants: No place like home

From Economist

See? Our bouillabaisse is made right here! GIVEN the state of France?s economy, its politicians ought to have bigger worries. But one of the hottest topics in parliament these days is how to force restaurants to reveal whether they make their boeuf bourguignon on the premises or rip open packets and warm up the contents.On June 27th the lower house approved an amendment to a consumer-rights bill that will force restaurants to label the dishes they prepare from fresh ingredients in their own ... Quick Read

Zynga: In the doghouse

From Economist

Dog days for Zynga ONE of the popular games that propelled Zynga to prominence is ?Mafia Wars?. Now the online-gaming company, which went public in 2011, has found a Don to run it. On July 1st Zynga said that Don Mattrick, a Microsoft executive, will replace Mark Pincus as its boss. Mr Pincus, the company?s founder, will stay on as chairman and ?chief product officer?.All has not been well at Zynga?s headquarters in San Francisco, dubbed ?the doghouse? because of the giant posters of its ... Quick Read

Indian energy: A price worth paying

From Economist

ONE of India?s big strategic worries is energy security. It imports most of its oil. It has lots of coal but struggles to dig it up, mainly because of the state mining monopoly?s ineptitude. Gas is in demand but too little is pumped: by 2016 two-fifths of India?s supply is likely to come from expensive imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG). All this leaves India exposed to supply interruptions in the Middle East and elsewhere, and strains its balance of payments.India has not encouraged enough ... Quick Read

Taiwan?s information-technology industry: After the personal computer

From Economist

Small objects of desire THE first iPhone went on sale on June 29th 2007. Tom Sun recalls the date easily, because TPK, of which he is the chief executive, began manufacturing exactly four weeks before, making touchscreens for Apple?s gadget. This year, Mr Sun estimates, 1.2 billion mobile phones will be made with touchscreens. The iPad has since ?created a segment?, the tablet, that he says is ?100% touch?.TPK?s booth at Computex, a trade fair in Taipei last month, proudly showed off the ... Quick Read

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