X
Overview
The Basics
Getting Around
Shopping
Restaurants
Attractions
Climate Info
Events
Airports
 
Popular City Guides

Glasgow Travel Guide

Glasgow Travel Information

Electricity

Electrical current is 230 volts, 50Hz. Round, three-pin plugs are standard.

Language

South Africa has 11 official languages, including Afrikaans, English, Xhosa, Zulu and Sotho. English is widely spoken.

Tipping

Waitering is a livelihood and a tip of 10% is expected for good service, if a service charge is not included in the bill. Tipping for services rendered is widely anticipated by porters, taxi drivers and petrol attendants. Golf caddies should be tipped accordingly. 'Car guards' operate in the city centres and tourist spots and will offer to look after your parked car; they are usually immigrants from neighbouring countries looking for work and will expect anything from R2 upwards on your return.

Safety Information

Safety is an issue and visitors to South Africa should be aware of the country's high incidence of crime. Although this tends to be concentrated in pockets throughout the country, for example in the township areas, opportunistic crime is fairly widespread. Travellers should always be aware of these risks and exercise the necessary precautions. Doors should be locked when driving and one should not walk alone at night in city streets, isolated beaches or remote areas. Berea and Hillbrow in Johannesburg are high-risk areas and visitors should be cautious in these areas. There have been recent incidents of robbery involving hikers walking on Table Mountain and Lions Head in Cape Town so visitors should avoid hiking alone. Be vigilant when using ATMs and do not display signs of wealth (e.g. mobile phones, money, expensive jewellery) on the streets. It is worthwhile noting that the South African authorities do give high priority to the protection of tourists. Power outages are common throughout the country; frequent blackouts and rolling power cuts in January 2008 has forced the government to acknowledge that the country has an electricity crisis on its hands.

Local Customs

South African culture and etiquette in urban areas is very Western. While standards of dress vary, beachwear is not to be worn off the beach, and nude sunbathing is only permissible in a very few designated areas. While in African townships it is frowned on for women to wear pants or shorts and homosexuality is frowned on, whereas it is legal and acceptable in all other areas. Although locals may complain loudly about the country and government, they will take offense if a foreigner is critical. Racism is a sensitive issue, however interracial relationships are widely accepted. South African racial terminology differs from what is acceptable in North America: the terms 'black' and 'white' are appropriate for those of African and Caucasian descent, respectively. 'Coloured' refers not to black Africans, but those of mixed African and European descent and is not considered an offensive term. South Africans are friendly and hospitable, and will often go out of their way to assist tourists who need help.

Business

South Africa's multicultural status means that business etiquette may vary with different people, and according to individual sectors, though it is most often similar to dealings in Europe and the United States. Although there are 11 official languages, English is the primary language of business. It is best to dress formally for initial meetings. Generally South Africans are regarded as relaxed and informal with regards to introductions and the handling of business cards. Shaking hands is common for both men and women. The giving of gifts is uncommon and unnecessary. Business hours are generally 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday with an hour taken over lunch from 1-2pm.

Communications

The international access code for South Africa is +27. The outgoing code is 00 followed by the relevant country code (e.g. 0044 for the United Kingdom). As of 8 January 2007, South Africa has changed to 10-digit dialling (so city codes must be included, e.g. 021 for Cape Town) and international dialling has changed from 09 to 00. GSM mobile phone networks providing 900 and 1800 frequencies serve the country. Mobile service providers offer very cheap 'pay-as-you-go' Sim cards, which are a good option for visitors staying for some time. Internet cafes are widespread. Card and coin operated pay phones are also widespread.

Duty Free

Travellers to South Africa do not have to pay duty on 400 cigarettes, 50 cigars and 250g of tobacco; 2 litres wine and 1 litre spirits; perfume up to 50ml and 250ml eau de toilette; and other goods to the value of R3,000. All other goods brought in from abroad by South African residents must be declared on arrival. These will be subject to import duties. For goods to be re-imported, travellers must complete a DA65 or NEP-form that is issued on departure. Prohibited items include meat and dairy products, all medication except for personal consumption, flick knives, ammunition, explosives and pornography containing minors and bestiality.


Travel guide by (c) Globe Media Ltd. By its very nature much of the information in this travel guide is subject to change at short notice and travellers are urged to verify information on which they're relying with the relevant authorities. We cannot accept any responsibility for any loss or inconvenience to any person as a result of information contained above.
Luxury Hotels in Glasgow >

Best Glasgow Hotel Rates

Blythswood Square

from 182.94 USD *

Hilton Garden Inn Glasgow City Centre

from 223.30 USD *
See All Specials For Glasgow Luxury Hotels >

* Lowest nightly rate based on select dates. Please click on hotel for details.

JustLuxe.com Luxury NEWS >