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Jordan Travel Guides

The Basics:


Electricity

Electrical current is 220 volts AC, 50Hz. European two-pin plugs are the most common.

Language

Arabic is the official language, but English is understood by most people involved in the tourist industry and by middle to upper class Jordanians.

Tipping

Most of the better hotels and restaurants will add a 10-12% service charge to the bill, but smaller establishments usually expect a tip. It is customary to round up the price of a taxi trip instead of tipping.

Safety Information

The vast majority of tourist visits to Jordan are safe and trouble free. However there remains a moderate risk of terrorist attacks throughout the Middle East including Jordan and foreigners should maintain a degree of vigilance particularly in public places frequented by tourists and at tourist sites. The situation in Iraq has had an impact on local opinion, as well as the violence between the neighbouring Israelis and Palestinians, and foreigners should avoid all public demonstrations and political gatherings. There is a fair degree of anti-American and anti-Western sentiment in the country, and no distinction is made between US government personnel and ordinary citizens. Care should be taken at the borders with Israel and Iraq. Crime is not a serious risk for travellers although on buses and in crowded places visitors could be the target of pickpockets or petty thieves.

Local Customs

The consumption of alcohol is strictly forbidden in the streets. It is advisable to respect local Muslim conservatism regarding dress and women in particular will be better respected if their legs and shoulders are covered in public places. It is advisable to ask permission before photographing people. Bargaining is expected with merchants especially in the markets. Religious customs should be respected, particularly during the month of Ramadan when eating, drinking and smoking during daylight hours should be discreet as it is forbidden by the Muslim culture. Homosexuality is illegal. Bedouin hospitality is genuine, but custom requires that visitors should leave some small gift in return for a meal or a glass of tea.

Business

Business in Jordan is conducted with an emphasis on modest, formal attire. Women, in particular, should be sure to dress conservatively. As with most Arab countries, business is very male-dominated and therefore women should clarify their role early in meetings. Meetings often start very late, but it is always advised to be punctual nonetheless. Most business is conducted in English, although using a few words of Arabic (particularly for titles) will be appreciated. Business cards are often exchanged. It is common to be invited for meals by one's host, who will usually pay the bill, although it is appreciated if the guest pays for the final meal or gives a small gift. Business hours are usually 9.30am to 1.30pm and 3.30pm to 6pm Sunday to Thursday.

Communications

The international dialling code for Jordan is +962. The outgoing code is 00 followed by the relevant country code (e.g. 0027 for South Africa). Jordan has international direct dialling with most countries. City/area codes are in use, e.g. (0)3 for both Aqaba and Petra, and (0)6 for Amman. Mobile phone companies have roaming agreements with most international mobile phone operators. There are Internet cafes in Amman and most major towns.

Duty Free

Travellers to Jordan over 18 years do not have to pay duty on 200 cigarettes or 25 cigars, or 200 grams of pipe tobacco; 1 litre of alcohol, 1 or 2 bottles of perfume and eau-de-Cologne or lotion for personal use; and gifts to the value of JD50 or US$150. Restricted items include firearms, sporting guns and other weapons without prior approval from authorities of country of origin and destination country. Prohibited items include all narcotics and birds or bird products.


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