X
RESERVATIONS Find a Restaurant in Your City
  • Atlanta
  • Baltimore
  • Boston
  • Chicago
  • Dallas
  • Denver
  • Houston
  • Las Vegas
  • Los Angeles
  • Miami
  • Minneapolis
  • New Orleans
  • New York City
  • Philadelphia
  • Phoenix
  • Portland
  • San Diego
  • San Francisco Bay Area
  • Seattle
  • Washington, D.C.
Overview
The Basics
Getting Around
Attractions
Climate Info
Events
Airports
 
Popular City Guides

Nice Travel Guide

Nice Travel Information

Electricity

Electrical current is 220 volts, 50Hz. European two-pin plugs are standard.

Language

French is the official language.

Tipping

Most restaurants and hotels automatically add a 15% service charge so a tip is not necessary, although another 2-3% is customary if the service has been good. If service is not included then 15% is customary. Taxi drivers expect 10-15% of the fare and hairdressers 10%. Hotel staff generally receive EUR1.50 a day and tips of EUR1 are given to washroom and cloakroom attendants and museum tour guides. Tour bus drivers and guides are also tipped.

Safety Information

Following the London and Madrid bombings, security has been heightened particularly in the transport sector. Unattended luggage left in public places will be removed or destroyed by security staff. While generally safe, visitors to France are advised to take precautions against petty theft and to ensure their personal safety. Thieves and pickpockets operate on the metro and around airports. Theft from cars is prevalent, particularly in the south, around Marseilles, and in Corsica. A Corsican nationalist group FLNC have been responsible for a series of bomb attacks on public buildings and holiday homes in Corsica and visitors should take care, particularly in Ajaccio the capital, and other town centres. Several recent cases of burglary have been reported while visitors were asleep in their caravans or motorhomes and motorists are asked to avoid parking in isolated or darkened areas of camping sites or parking lots. Tourists are advised to conceal bags and purses even when driving, and to never leave valuables unattended in the car. Bag snatching is also common, particularly on public transport and in shopping centres, and visitors should also be vigilant of luggage while loading bags into and out of hire cars at airports.

Local Customs

French culture is of paramount importance to the French and in an increasingly Americanised world they feel duty-bound to protect it. It is appreciated if visitors can speak a few words of French; they do not respond well to being shouted at in English. While the food is second to none, foreigners may find the service in many restaurants sloppy; waiters can appear rude (particularly in Paris) and take their time. This is just the way they are. Traditional games such as (similar to lawn bowling but played on gravel) are popular in village squares, but the national sports are soccer, rugby and cycling. Smoking in public places is not allowed and will incur heavy fines.

Business

Business etiquette is important in France. A smart, fashionable, sense of dress is common as the nation prides itself on . Punctuality is not always observed though and the 'fashionably late' tactic may be applied. A handshake is the common form of greeting for men and women upon first introductions. Titles are important and the person is to be referred to as 'monsieur' (Mr.), 'madame' (Mrs.), or 'mademoiselle' (Ms.). Meetings usually occur over lunches, and the French are known to enjoy food. Business hours are generally 9am to 6pm Monday to Friday.

Communications

The international access code for France is +33. The outgoing code depends on what network is used to dial out on (e.g. 00 for France Telecom), which is followed by the relevant country code (e.g. 0044 for the United Kingdom). Other codes are used if using different networks. The area code for Paris is (0)1. Most public telephones accept phone cards, which are available in newsagents. Most hotels add a surcharge to calls, which can be very expensive; the cheapest way to call abroad is often with a phone card from a public telephone or at a post office. The local mobile phone operators use GSM networks and have roaming agreements with most international mobile phone companies. Internet cafes are available in towns throughout France.

Duty Free

Travellers from non-EU countries over 17 years entering France can bring in the following items duty-free: 200 cigarettes, or 100 cigarillos, or 50 cigars, or 250g tobacco; 1 litre of spirits with alcohol content 22% and over, or 2 litres of dessert wine or sparkling wine not exceeding 22% alcohol volume, and 2 litres of table wine; 50g perfume or 250ml eau de toilette and other goods to the value of EUR175 per adult or EUR90 for children under 15 years.


Travel guide by (c) Globe Media Ltd. By its very nature much of the information in this travel guide is subject to change at short notice and travellers are urged to verify information on which they're relying with the relevant authorities. We cannot accept any responsibility for any loss or inconvenience to any person as a result of information contained above.
Luxury Hotels in Nice >

Best Nice Hotel Rates

Beau Rivage Hotel et Plage

Seasonal deal: save 20% on select nights from 233.38 USD *

Le Meridien Nice

from 355.85 USD *
See All Specials For Nice Luxury Hotels >

* Lowest nightly rate based on select dates. Please click on hotel for details.

JustLuxe.com Luxury NEWS >