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390 Years of Culinary Tradition Fuels CHAYA Brasserie

Mar. 1st, 2013 | Comments 0 | Make a Comment   
Photo Courtesy of CHAYA
Executive Chef Shigefumi Tachibe of CHAYA Brasserie in Beverly Hills was highly honored when the Smithsonian asked to display one of his sushi knives in its collection “Going Global: Los Angeles, 2000 – Fusion Food.” The culinary paintbrush the museum acquired from Tachibe represents the chef's dedication to his craft. For over three decades Tachibe has helped to continue 390 years of family history.
 CHAYA Beverly Hills
Photo Courtesy of CHAYA

The Tsunoda family began the CHAYA restaurant brand in the 1600's, operating a series of tea houses throughout Japan before emigrating to the United States. Maintaining the Tsunoda family tradition, Tachibe was appointed Executive Corporate Chef of CHAYA Restaurants by Yuji Tsunoda in 1981. Recently we had the chance to experience the restaurant’s US flagship (opened in 1984), CHAYA Brasserie.

Photo Courtesy of CHAYA
  CHAYA Beverly Hills
Photo Courtesy of 2Sense-Los Angeles

Situated right off West Hollywood's trendy Robertson Boulevard with its enclave of shopping and eateries, the first of the four California locations is not only nostalgic, but famed in its own right. White tablecloths, plush sectional seating and waiters wearing ties create CHAYA’s vintage Beverly Hills bistro ambiance. The bamboo tree installation growing from the restaurant’s center and the perpetually stylish crowd around the bar add a modern flair. Any given evening you might see a celebrity sipping on a subtly sweet and citrusy CHAYA Mule, fresh off the mixology menu, while you yourself feel the cool calm of a hotspot that doesn't ruffle its feathers at such common LA occurrences.

Photo Courtesy of 2Sense-Los Angeles
  CHAYA Beverly Hills
Photo Courtesy of CHAYA

Once a bottle of wine from the impressive menu (featuring Japanese and French Bistro fusion) is ordered, Chef Tachibe's knife cuts in. The Kobi Beef Roll ($18), wrapped around spicy shrimp and asparagus before drizzled with balsamic-eel reduction further sharpens our appreciation of this 28-year-old Beverly Hills mainstay. Classics such as Tuna Tartare ($16) remain; however diners can also find healthy options, such as offerings from the crudo menu, which CHAYA created in response to Hollywood’s health trends. Before ordering The Miso Sea Bass ($34), which arrived glazed and swimming in wasabi Beurre Blanc, the Poached Oysters with Crostini ($14) and Fuji Apple Salad ($11) set the evening in motion.

Photo Courtesy of CHAYA
  CHAYA Beverly Hills
Photo Courtesy of CHAYA

Word to the wise, if you order CHAYA’s 10 oz. Ribeye, leave ample room for the brasserie-style Chocolate Croissant Bread Pudding ($9) accompanied by vanilla caramel ice cream…need we say more? Yes! CHAYA also offers an all night happy hour, ideal for business travelers or as a stop-off before an evening on the town. CHAYA’s fine dining, handcrafted drinks and time-tested appreciation have well-earned their spot in Beverly Hills, let alone a nod from the Smithsonian.

Photo Courtesy of CHAYA
   CHAYA Beverly Hills
Photo Courtesy of CHAYA

Photo Courtesy of CHAYA
  CHAYA Beverly Hills
Photo Courtesy of 2Sense-Los Angeles

Photo Courtesy of 2Sense-Los Angeles
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Eric Rosen
Eric Rosen lives in Los Angeles and writes about food, wine, travel and adventure... usually in some combination of the four. He regularly contributes to Los Angeles...

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